What is gluten?

Contrary to what you may have heard, gluten is not harmful for most people to ingest.

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Let me set the record straight. Gluten refers to a specific set of proteins. Proteins are large molecules made up of amino acids that perform a vast range of actions necessary for life in all living organisms. In this case, gluten proteins contribute to vital life functions for the plants of wheat, barley, and rye.

The word “gluten” comes from the Latin word for glue, and rightly so. Gluten proteins are responsible for the qualities in bread such as elasticity, chewiness, and shape1. When baking bread and other products containing these proteins, the mixture thickens and rises because of thousands of gluten proteins sticking together as the temperature increases.

Foods containing gluten:

(Not a comprehensive list)

  • Pasta
  • Bread
  • Crackers
  • Baked goods
  • Cereal and granola
  • Pancakes and waffles
  • Flour tortillas
  • Beer
  • Milkshakes

While reflecting on this list, it may seem that going gluten-free could be a way to reduce fat intake and lose some weight. After all, beer and bread are notorious for contributing to weight gain. Avoiding these foods could help you lose weight, but gluten is not at all the only ingredient contributing to this circumstance. If you choose instead gluten-free substitutes for the food items listed above, you are not improving your chances at weight loss. In fact, you are more likely to gain weight by changing your diet to eating the gluten-free form of these foods.

In a study done last year in Spain, scientists looked at the nutritional differences between gluten-containing products and their gluten-free alternatives.2 Gluten-free bread was found to contain less protein, but two times the amount of fat (a lose-lose situation). Similarly, gluten-free pasta exhibited these changes, and in addition it contained more sodium and less fiber (more bad news). Cereal bars and flour followed this same trend.

Although it has been shown that food altered to be gluten-free is less nutritious than its natural form, fortunately there are plenty of naturally gluten-free options to choose from for people suffering from Celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions in the realm of gluten intolerance. Fruit, vegetables, rice, corn, and potato are all naturally gluten-free options for healthy eating.1

Now that I have established what gluten is, what food it is found in, and the nature of gluten-free substitutes, hopefully your opinion of gluten has been fine-tuned. In the next part of this series about gluten, I will discuss Celiac disease as well as rheumatoid arthritis – and why people living with these conditions live a gluten-free lifestyle.

References:

  1. Gluten-Free Diet – Celiac Disease Foundation. (n.d.). Retrieved June 9, 2015, from http://celiac.org/live-gluten-free/glutenfreediet/
  1. Miranda, J., Lasa, A., Bustamante, M.A., Churruca, I., and Simon, E. March 2014. Nutritional Differences Between a Gluten-free Diet and a Diet Containing Equivalent Products with Gluten. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 69(410).

Image source:

berrycart.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/gluten.png

Special thanks to Christine Rardin for the video reference!

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